For those looking for information specifically about restorative justice (RJ) I'd like to point out Restorative Justice Online, an excellent resource provided by Prison Fellowship International's Centre for Justice and Reconciliation. RJ Online's daily blog has excellent news stories, opinion pieces and other articles related to the world of restorative justice from an organization that has done so much to promote alternatives to "crime and punishment." They also have an extensive library, which is fully searchable and currently boasts 10361 publications on restorative justice!

Thanks to PFI for all the excellent work they do.

I'll be letting everyone here know when new articles have been posted to our eForum, IIRP's online newsletter, which now hosts literally hundreds of articles about restorative practices around the world. This is a huge resource, which is fully searchable. To access the library, click here and to subscribe to the eForum please click here.

New Two Part Article

Throughout Latin America there are growing efforts to confront the social consequences of poverty and violence. Restorative practices provides an outlook that is appealing to many who are working to bring people together to resolve problems and transform the nature of society.

This two-part article by Joshua Wachtel discusses how individuals in Latin America are implementing restorative practices in their organizations, schools and communities. Part One discusses Nicaragua, Panama and Colombia. Part Two talks about Mexico and Peru and references work in Brazil.

Links to Report:

 

The report on the effectiveness of anti-bullying interventions was conducted September 2008 — November 2010 by the Unit for School and Family Studies, based at Goldsmiths, University of London, with support from the Anti-Bullying Alliance.

According to the report, “Restorative approaches provide an effective, flexible range of strategies to prevent and respond to bullying."

Les Davey, CEO of IIRP UK and Vice-Chair of the Restorative Justice Council says, “We owe it to those subject to bullying and harassment to provide an effective and inclusive process which offers a real opportunity to tackle such inappropriate behaviour head on and I firmly believe that a restorative strategy can provide such opportunity.”

Throughout Latin America there are growing efforts to confront the social consequences of poverty and violence. Restorative practices provides an outlook that is appealing to many who are working to bring people together to resolve problems and transform the nature of society.  This two-part article discusses how individuals in Latin America are implementing restorative practices in their organizations, schools and communities. Part one discusses Nicaragua, Panama and Colombia. Part two talks about Mexico and Peru and references work in Brazil.

Estamos incrementando nuestros esfuerzos en todo Latinoamérica para hacer frente a las consecuencias sociales de la pobreza y la violencia. Las prácticas restaurativas proporcionan una perspectiva que resulta atractiva para muchos de los que están trabajando con el objetivo de reunir a las personas para que resuelvan sus problemas y así, transformar la naturaleza de la sociedad.

Este artículo de dos partes escrito por Joshua Wachtel discute cómo es que los individuos en Latinoamérica están implementando las prácticas restaurativas en sus organizaciones, escuelas y comunidades. La Parte uno del artículo aborda los casos de Nicaragua, Panamá y Colombia. La Parte dos habla sobre México y Perú y hace referencia al trabajo realizado en Brasil.

 

This is part of one of an article on how individuals in Latin America are implementing restorative practices in their organizations, schools and communities. Part one discusses Nicaragua, Panama and Colombia. Part two talks about Mexico and Peru and references work in Brazil.

There are now two IIRP affiliates in Latin America: the Central American Center for Restorative Practices (Centro de Prácticas Restaurativas para Centroamerica), headquartered in Costa Rica — website: cprca.iirp.edu, headed by Miguel Tello; and the Latin American Institute for Restorative Practices (Instituto Latino Americano de Prácticas Restaurativas), headquartered in Peru — website: ilapr.iirp.edu, headed by Jean Schmitz. The IIRP is moving toward translating all of its trainings, films and books into Spanish and Portuguese.

Throughout Latin America, there are growing efforts to confront the social consequences of poverty and violence. Restorative practices provides an outlook that is appealing to many who are working to bring people together to resolve problems and transform the nature of society.

This is part of two of an article on how individuals in Latin America are implementing restorative practices in their organizations, schools and communities. There are now two IIRP affiliates Part one discusses Nicaragua, Panama and Colombia. Part two talks about Mexico and Peru and references work in Brazil.

There are now two IIRP affiliates in Latin America: the Central American Center for Restorative Practices (Centro de Prácticas Restaurativas para Centroamerica), headquartered in Costa Rica — website: cprca.iirp.edu, headed by Miguel Tello; and the Latin American Institute for Restorative Practices (Instituto Latino Americano de Prácticas Restaurativas), headquartered in Peru — website: ilapr.iirp.edu, headed by Jean Schmitz. The IIRP is moving toward translating all of its trainings, films and books into Spanish and Portuguese.

Throughout Latin America, there are growing efforts to confront the social consequences of poverty and violence. Restorative practices provides an outlook that is appealing to many who are working to bring people together to resolve problems and transform the nature of society.

Este texto es la primera parte de un artículo que trata de cómo los individuos en América Latina están implementando las prácticas restaurativas dentro de sus organizaciones, escuelas y comunidades. La primera parte se enfoca en los esfuerzos que se están realizando en Nicaragua, Panamá y Colombia. La segunda parte [enlace] describe lo que está pasando en México y Perú y hace referencia al trabajo que se está haciendo en Brasil.

Ahora contamos con dos afiliados al IIRP en Latino América: el Centro de Prácticas Restaurativas para Centroamerica, ubicado en Costa Rica - página web: cprca.iirp.edu - dirigido por Miguel Tello; y el Instituto Latino Americano de Prácticas Restaurativas, ubicado en Perú - página web: ilapr.iirp.edu - dirigido por Jean Schmitz. El IIRP está trabajando para traducir todos sus materiales de capacitación, vídeos y libros al español y portugués.

En toda América Latina, se están haciendo esfuerzos crecientes por hacer frente a las consecuencias sociales de la pobreza y la violencia. Las Prácticas Restaurativas proporcionan una perspectiva que atrae a muchos que buscan unir a las personas para resolver problemas y transformar la esencia de la sociedad.

Miguel Tello es originario de México, actualmente vive y trabaja en San José, Costa Rica. Inicialmente, el Sr. Tello se involucró con el IIRP cuando contactó al fundador del IIRP, Ted Wachtel, para obtener su permiso para traducir al español el artículo de su autoria “Justicia Restaurativa en la Vida Cotidiana” a fin de utilizarlo en una conferencia de la Confraternidad Carcelaria Internacional. Posteriormente, el Sr. Tello se capacitó con el IIRP y después se hizo capacitador de dicha organización.

Este texto es la segunda parte de un artículo sobre cómo los individuos en América Latina están implementando las prácticas restaurativas dentro de sus organizaciones, centros educativos y comunidades. Ahora contamos con dos afiliados al IIRP. La primera parte [enlace] se enfoca en los esfuerzos que se están realizando en Nicaragua, Panamá y Colombia. La segunda parte describe lo que está pasando en México y Perú y menciona el trabajo que se está haciendo en Brasil.

Ahora contamos con dos afiliados al IIRP en Latino América: el Centro de Prácticas Restaurativas para Centroamérica, ubicado en Costa Rica - página web: cprca.iirp.edu - dirigido por Miguel Tello; y el Instituto Latino Americano de Prácticas Restaurativas, ubicado en Perú - página web: ilapr.iirp.edu - dirigido por Jean Schmitz. El IIRP está trabajando para traducir todos sus materiales de capacitación, vídeos y libros al español y portugués.

Many people face a transition in their lives when promoted to a supervisor 

Reflective Questions:

  • What type of supervisor do I want to be and how do you want to lead others?
  • Do I want to give honest feedback even if it can be difficult to deliver?
  • When I have questions, how will I gain support from other leaders?
  • How would I want to describe the culture of our workplace…how do I create that?
  • How can I teach, direct, empower and develop the people I work with?
  • How can I hold the people accountable to the employment expectations while providing ample support simultaneously?
  • How is change created in our setting and how can I help that go better?
  • When I think of the leaders I respect most in my life, what where those characteristics?
 

but are ill-equipped to handle the nuances and social ramifications of this process. A restorative perspective, by making this transition more transparent, can help deal directly with the emotional and social change.

Before becoming a supervisor, many times people get to know their jobs and become quite good at the tasks and knowledge required to excel in their work. That’s usually why they get chosen to lead others.

Unfortunately, knowing how to do your job doesn’t necessary translate to knowing how to manage others. Too many times supervisors are picked because of seniority or expertise in their position rather than for their management strength. But supervising requires another skill set besides knowing the tasks.

In my opinion, a new supervisor is responsible to create a healthy workplace environment through participatory and empowering processes. This can be difficult at times depending on the structure of the workplace and the amount of support you receive from other leaders. Gaining an understanding of one’s own worldview as it relates to authority and power may help guide a supervisor’s decisions.

Supervisors can pose self-reflective questions that explore their guiding principles and perspective. These questions can be used as a newer supervisor, when transitioning to another position or as a veteran supervisor.

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