Many people face a transition in their lives when promoted to a supervisor 

Reflective Questions:

  • What type of supervisor do I want to be and how do you want to lead others?
  • Do I want to give honest feedback even if it can be difficult to deliver?
  • When I have questions, how will I gain support from other leaders?
  • How would I want to describe the culture of our workplace…how do I create that?
  • How can I teach, direct, empower and develop the people I work with?
  • How can I hold the people accountable to the employment expectations while providing ample support simultaneously?
  • How is change created in our setting and how can I help that go better?
  • When I think of the leaders I respect most in my life, what where those characteristics?
 

but are ill-equipped to handle the nuances and social ramifications of this process. A restorative perspective, by making this transition more transparent, can help deal directly with the emotional and social change.

Before becoming a supervisor, many times people get to know their jobs and become quite good at the tasks and knowledge required to excel in their work. That’s usually why they get chosen to lead others.

Unfortunately, knowing how to do your job doesn’t necessary translate to knowing how to manage others. Too many times supervisors are picked because of seniority or expertise in their position rather than for their management strength. But supervising requires another skill set besides knowing the tasks.

In my opinion, a new supervisor is responsible to create a healthy workplace environment through participatory and empowering processes. This can be difficult at times depending on the structure of the workplace and the amount of support you receive from other leaders. Gaining an understanding of one’s own worldview as it relates to authority and power may help guide a supervisor’s decisions.

Supervisors can pose self-reflective questions that explore their guiding principles and perspective. These questions can be used as a newer supervisor, when transitioning to another position or as a veteran supervisor.

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