volcano.jpgOn June 3, 2018, the Volcán de Fuego (Fire Volcano) in Guatemala erupted, killing 300 people and leaving close to 2,000 homeless and relocated to temporary shelters. Lava flows buried the towns of Alotenango and San Miguel Los Lotes; El Rodeo was also highly impacted.

The government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and international response was focused on relocating villagers to safe locations and providing health care, medicines and food, as well as initiating a formal plan to move entire communities that would not be able to live in those high-risk areas again.

However, the emergency response made no effort to listen to the people affected by the eruption or to provide them with a space where they could find emotional support and release some of the emotions around the trauma they suffered. Asociación para el Liderazgo en Guatemala (ALG), a local NGO that trains other NGO leaders in the country, offered an intervention that provided a space for both people displaced by the eruption and emergency response teams to find support in the use of restorative circles. This article will examine ALG ́s intervention and offer some lessons learned about providing circles to people affected by natural disaster, and how they can be helpful in coping with the aftermath of such a traumatic event.

A. Miguel Tello is an IIRP Lecturer and Executive Director of the Strachan Foundation based in Costa Rica; Flor García Mencos is an IIRP Trustee and Executive Director of the Asociación para el Liderazgo en Guatemala.

Read the full paper, which was published in ENGAGE! Co-created knowledge serving the public good, 1(3), 2020.

Daniel Goleman200x200The IIRP Graduate School sponsored the December 2020 WOBI (World of Business Ideas) digital event on the theme of emotional intelligence in leadership. Featured speaker Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., who wrote the bestselling book Emotional Intelligence (1995), joined IIRP President John W. Bailie, Ph.D., to discuss why emotional intelligence is more important now than ever, not only for business leaders but all of us.

It was an honor to speak with Dan Goleman. His work on emotional intelligence has been a tremendous influence on my personal practice as a leader. Dan’s thinking has also been foundational to the work of my institution, the IIRP Graduate School — the world’s first graduate school wholly dedicated to the science of relationships and community.

Our world is increasingly complex. The COVID-19 pandemic, political unrest, and economic realignment are all accelerating the pace of change. (Text continues below.)

Claire is the Representative for IIRP Latin America. She is based in San José, Costa Rica.

claire3What about the "restorative practices thing"?

When people ask me about this “restorative-practices-thing” that I am always talking about, I usually make a summary – unfair as all summaries are – that goes a little bit like this:

(1)  Restore the value of the person. Michael White said it well: the person isn’t the problem; the problem is the problem. To separate deed from doer helps us to honor each person’s dignity, even when we disagree or even disapprove certain behaviors

2020electionHow the IIRP Graduate School is using restorative practices to talk about the 2020 presidential election.

The IIRP Graduate School is aware of the uncertainty and stress surrounding the U.S. election. We held circles internally to help faculty, staff and trustees begin to process their feelings. We decided to share our process for others to use and learn from.

Watch Henry L. McClendon, Jr., Director of Community Engagement, and Lecturer Beth Smull share their experience using restorative practices to talk about the 2020 U.S. election in the workplace.

Read and feel free to adapt two agendas that demonstrate a proactive circle and a responsive circle designed to help organizations talk about difficult subjects, such as the 2020 U.S. Election.

Check out professional development opportunities to strengthen your restorative practices skills.

The IIRP is proud to announce that Trudy Junkroski is the 2020 recipient of the Shawn Suzch Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded in memory of Shawn Suzch, a young man who overcame adversity with courage and determination and gave his life for his country.

"One of the motivations for entering into this field of study is to support the implementation of restorative practices in response to serious crimes and incarceration," says Trudy. "At Everglades Correctional Institution in Miami, where I volunteer, incarcerated individuals in the Horizon program have become partners in building community and creating paths forward for those facing the challenges of life inside and outside of prison."

She adds, "I am a person who wants to step into difficult spaces, even when it's uncomfortable to do so. I am deeply grateful to receive the Shawn Suzch scholarship honoring his extraordinary life and the courageous partners in Shawn’s own journey. I look forward to proudly representing Shawn’s spirit in my own work and continued studies at IIRP."

Congratulations, Trudy!

Bruce and JohnBruce Schenk (right), along with IIRP President John Bailie at the IIRP Canada Conference in Toronto, 2018.It is with a great sense of warmth and gratitude that we say farewell to Bruce Schenk, who is retiring as Director of IIRP Canada after serving for 12 years. Bruce’s pioneering work in Canada has been instrumental in extending the ability of individuals and organizations to foster healthy, meaningful relationships in schools, justice systems, workplaces and other areas of society.

“When I started in 2008, restorative justice was a known thing in criminal and juvenile justice circles in Canada, and a little bit in schools, but not restorative practices,” says Bruce. “The thing I’m feeling really good about is how restorative practice is now seen as applicable to so many areas, especially education, and IIRP Canada has had a big role in that.”

One of our IIRP Canada Instructors, Caroline Gosling was recently a guest on the Ever Active PodClass Podcast to discuss Restorative Justice in a School Setting.

Click to listen here on any of your podcast subscription services.

 

Download the resource kit.

2020 RJ Basic Resource Kit Final E 862x1293

 

Restorative Practices & Safe Schools – changes in legislation in Ontario for primary students and the application of Restorative Practices

Finally!!!

I was recently researching Bill 197 and its amendments to The Education Act, more specifically the changes in regulations to suspensions of Junior Kindergarten to Grade 3 students. I thought it would be important to brush up on these new regulations given that I had been recently called into a school as a “supply principal”.   

Many leaders in education have highlighted the importance of establishing collaborative communities for teaching and learning mathematics.

In recent years there has been a lot of research addressing the common occurrence of math anxiety and its negative impact on teaching and learning math.  Specifically, experiences where there has been a focus on speed and reaching correct answers by following a particular rule, procedure or method have been connected to the development of math anxiety in many teachers and students.

Restorative Works 2020 cover
Restorative Works Year in Review 2020 (PDF)

All our donors are acknowledged annually in Restorative Works.